Skip to main content

Copyright rules for lecturers at SDU: Film, Radio & TV

Mediastream Media Collections

AVU-Plus agreement

The Internet Archive

Film, Radio and TV

TV and radio programmes

Mediestream
You have access to radio and TV programmes via Mediestream, which is the Royal Danish Library's media collections containing newspapers, radio and TV programmes as well as commercials.
The radio and TV programmes in Mediestream date back to 2005 and new programmes are continuously added. Programmes broadcasted today can be found in Mediestream with 14 days delay. You can find programmes from the national radio and TV channels as well as local radio and TV stations.

See Mediestream's list of radio and TV channels here

On the WAYF page, you must choose "Syddansk Universitet" and use your SDU login to get access.
The contents of Mediestream should only be used for research, studies or educational purposes.

The AVU-Plus agreement
SDU also has an agreement which allows you to copy and store TV programmes from several Danish and foreign TV channels for educational purposes.

See the list of TV channels included in the AVU-Plus agreement here.

You MAY place the material on elearn.sdu.dk. Contact Medieværkstedet for more information.
You may NOT copy movies produced for cinema, even if they have been shown on TV.

TV and radio stations make more and more of their products available online (on demand). Even though it is tempting to use small snippets of programmes from their websites, you are NOT allowed to copy the programmes to elearn.sdu.dk without permission.
Use links to these websites instead.

Movies
Film and videos are subject to copyright law. If you wish to use motion pictures in your courses, you will have to get permission from the copyright holders. 

Teachers are allowed to use movies as part of the curriculum, but it is forbidden to show movies, upload or share them with students - also on elearn.sdu.dk - without the copyright holders' permission.

SDU does not have an agreement regarding movies, employees and students have to get permission to use these by themselves. 

YouTube
YouTube and similar platforms contain materials that are also subject to copyright law. You are only allowed to show such a video if it is the copyright holder himself who has uploaded the video.

You are not allowed to make changes in the video or use it in any other context unless it is specified in the video or the video has been marked with a creative commons license. 

Sometimes it can be difficult to determine who the copyright holder is and if the video has been published legally. 
If you wish to show or use a video from YouTube or a similar platform you need to check:

  • Who is the copyright holder of the film/movie?
  • Who has made the video accessible?
  • Has the copyright holder mentioned what you can do with the film?
  • Is the video marked with a creative commons license?

If these things are obvious, you can show or use the video.

If the video is not marked with a creative commons license or in another way described with the permitted use, you will have to contact the copyright holder and ask permission to use the video - an email confirmation is enough. 

Remember that the copyright on films expires 70 years after the death of the director/author or likewise. Film and movies where the copyright has expired can be shown and used without asking for permission. 

The Internet Archive
The Internet Archive has older movies with free access which you are allowed to use in your teaching.

For further information, please contact Line Kronqvist Jensen or Jens Dam at the library.